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BusinessExclusive InterviewsPR & Marketing

Wally Nguyen: Why Downloads Are Dead

August 25, 2016 — by David Radd

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Wally Nguyen, CEO of mNectar, helped found the company about three and a half years ago. Inspiration hit while on iTunes, they were able to listen to a song for 30 seconds before buying it or the album. Wally had a “light-bulb moment” that if you could do that with a song, then why not with a game.

“My co-founder comes from a technical background and there were ads that let you manipulate an image back then, and I asked if they had that, why can’t you play a game?” Wally said. “Back then we raised a little bit of a money with developers like with Kabam being our first customers. With playable ads, 99 percent of our customers are game developers or publishers, giving people a sample of their games.”

Exclusive Interviews

Mochammad Santaka: Expanding Gaming in Indonesia

August 20, 2016 — by David Radd

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Games make humanity better, providing entertainment and a medium to express themselves. - Mochammad…Click To Tweet

Mochammad Santaka has been active in the Indonesian gaming industry since 2008. They started out as a journalist, doing both print and web media back in the early 2000s and also established the Video Games Indonesia website (defunct in 2016). Santaka is now the current manager of Gamevil‘s Indonesian office, and leads Dragon Blaze in South East Asia. They shed some light on what an Indonesian gamer is like, as well as on peculiarities of management.


DevelopmentExclusive InterviewsIndustry

Joshua Granick Joining FlowPlay for Platform Development

August 18, 2016 — by David Radd

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Vegas World Free Slots on iOS

FlowPlay has appointed Joshua Granick to be scientist-in-residence. Joshua will help FlowPlay’s platform grow and change, though will remain with OpenFL as managing director. FlowPlay is in the process of transitioning Vegas World to OpenFL and plans to do so with its games that are present and future to the engine.

“Thousands of games, technologies and industries are already using OpenFL, and it’s a perfect fit to enable FlowPlay’s future development plans,” said Joshua. “By transitioning to OpenFL, FlowPlay has increased the versatility of the company’s multiplayer platform while accelerating development times and freeing up more resources to focus on new innovation. I’m eager to become a part of that process and help raise awareness on how OpenFL can help other developers in the casual games industry.”

Part of OpenFL’s appeal and reason for its rapid expansion is the fact that it’s open-source software. Joshua says they want to make the world a better place using OpenFL. They feel like making OpenFL a paid product would work against that goal.

AudioExclusive Interviews

Rob King: The Might and Majesty of Sound

August 6, 2016 — by David Radd

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Rob King has been doing sound work in the video gaming industry since the early ’90s. While he’s probably best known for his work on the Might & Magic and EverQuest series, he’s also done work on Prototype 2, Jade Empire, and the Fable series.

Rob’s work extends out from music composition to general sound production, having won the Grand-Prize for the 2004 Yamaha International Music Production Contest and winning of the 2004 Los Angeles Music Awards for “Best Engineer”. He has also worked various film and TV projects, including The Legend of Korra. Rob has also made music with various bands, winning “Modern Rock Album of the Year” for his work on the CD Addictions & Scars by his band Red Delicious.

BusinessFeatured ReadIndustryUSA 2016

Rewarded video touted as effective tool for developers at Casual Connect USA

August 5, 2016 — by Casey Rock

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Video ads are quickly becoming the advertising industry’s new mainstay. Gone are the days of static placements and banner ads. At Casual Connect USA 2016, MoPub’s group product manager, Boris Logvinskiy, explained why video has become such an important advertising format during his lecture Rewarded Video: Optimize Your Strategy.

“According to eMarketer, thirty minutes is the amount of time spent looking at videos by the average user,” Boris noted. “That makes up 10 percent of the total time spent on mobile devices. This year it’s expected that $4.2 billion will be spent on mobile video advertising – and that’s expected to grow to $6 billion in 2018.”

DevelopmentEditorialStudio Spotlight

GameDuell Studio Spotlight

June 17, 2016 — by Carl Quinton

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I recently went to Berlin to prepare for the upcoming Casual Connect show there in 2017. While there I spent several days visiting a few game studios and other companies in the industry, and I would have to say my visit to GameDuell was one of the highlights of my trip.

I remember my first exposure to GameDuell; they were a Platinum sponsor of Casual Connect Europe. They had a really fun setup with very colorful cube chairs, a projector, big banners labeled “GameDuell is cool” and very eccentric people. If you are lucky enough to visit their office, you will probably agree with me that GameDuell is definitely very cool.

DevelopmentExclusive InterviewsIndie

Rasheed Abu-Eideh: Bringing the Shadows of War to Light

June 11, 2016 — by David Radd

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Liyla and the Shadows of War is a game that wasn’t made with profit in mind. It’s a free mobile game, and one that has a serious message to it about the 2014 Israel–Gaza conflict.

The game was recently the winner of Reboot Develop Indie Award in category of “Visual Excellence”. It was also nominated for Best in Show & Most Innovative Game and Best Game Narrative for ‪Indie Prize at Casual Connect Asia 2016. But talking to Rasheed Abu-Eideh, the creator of Liyla and the Shadows of War, it was not a easy road to the game’s release.

DevelopmentExclusive InterviewsIndieOnline

Defold for a Mobile Spin-Off: Developer’s Perspective

June 11, 2016 — by Orchid

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In order to test Defold on “outside” devs other than King, their team gave early access to a Swedish indie developer Johan Hogfeldt and his team of Hammarhaja AB, whose game is called Hammerwatch Coliseum. King’s CTO Thomas Hartwig says this developer helped them define the community they wanted to build around Defold. While working on the game, Johan was sharing his feedback, and his game has already been released on iOS. After the show Gamesauce reached out to Johan to check out his impressions from the engine.


Exclusive Interviews

Solution Tree: PLCs and the Future of Education

May 28, 2016 — by David Radd

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Solution Tree is an organization that helps train teachers and school leaders from kindergarten to grade 12. They help educators in four ways: by publishing books and shippable products like DVDs, putting on events and conferences in the U.S. and around the world, contractors that doing consulting work for teachers and school leaders, and digital products that help both with educator coordination and for teaching aspects of education.

One of the more important people on the software side for Solution Tree is Chris Morgan, Vice President of Information Technology. They detailed that one of the major focuses for Solution Tree is professional learning communities (PLCs) and enhancing them with their Global PD software. Describing PLCs as similar to scrum for software development, Chris says it is a methodology for managing school work in a collaborative way.

ContributionsDevelopmentIndie

Leveraging Community So People Care About Your Game

May 22, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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Leveraging Community So People Care About Your Game: 4 ways to generate interest in your game outside of traditional news

by Kenny Johnston of Pocket Gems

Getting people excited about your mobile game is hard work. Whether it’s press, streamers or some unlucky bystander that you’ve cornered at a bus stop, people often just don’t care. This can be a sobering experience for someone who’s poured their blood, sweat and tears into a game only to see it fall on glazed eyes and deaf ears. This is also the main reason why so many developers you meet have that haunted sporadic eye twitch that’s usually reserved for DMV workers and bomb squads.

But you know what’s 100 times harder than getting someone to notice your game when it launches? Getting someone to care about your game after it launches. Even if you have a roadmap chalk full of updates, nerfs, buffs, new characters and customizable skins, pitching a game that’s already launched often feels like trying to get Miley Cyrus to go to prom with you (but with less press coverage). Without product updates, this gets even more challenging. Most PR will generally tell you to focus on momentum like revenue, downloads, and in-game metrics. However, in today’s landscape everyone outside of your competitors will still usually receive this with a symphony of yawns and eye rolls.

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