main

USA 2014Video Coverage

Mitch Zamara is Creating a Global Gaming Community | Casual Connect Video

August 7, 2014 — by Catherine Quinton

feature57.jpg

“To me, there is three really big things that are forgotten when you want to launch a game around the world: localization, testing, and live operations,” Mitch Zamara explained during Casual Connect USA 2014.

DOWNLOAD SLIDES

1015457_10152995364975179_359771195_o
Mitch Zamara, Game Design Lead, FunPlus Game

Mitch Zamara, game design lead at FunPlus Game, says that for him, the greatest fun in the games industry comes from seeing his ideas become reality and knowing he is creating entertainment for millions of people.

It All Started At School

While at school working on a degree in computer science, Zamara decided he wanted to be a game designer. He decided the first step towards this goal would be taking the Game Design Workshop which was offered at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco. Unfortunately, the workshop was held the same week as his finals at school; he was left with an incredibly difficult decision. He chose to attend the workshop and the rest of the conference, which meant he had to drop out of school. But only two weeks later, he was offered a job with Zynga, and two months after that, he was officially a game designer.

Heading East

Zamara has now been with FunPlus Game for 11 months. They offered him the opportunity to go to China to build the next generation of social mobile games and lead the creative vision of the projects he works on. And there would be no holiday crunch time. The year-and-a-half he spent with Storm8 working on mobile games has been a definite help in his role with FunPlus. It has also been an advantage to have his close friend, Steven Johnson, who worked with him at Storm8, join the team to work with him at FunPlus. Zamara has also been helped by the experience he gained at Zynga in understanding the value of metrics and analysis.

Image 2
Barn Voyage is one of the games Zamara has worked with at FunPlus

Negative Tactics

The biggest challenge the game industry is currently facing, in Zamara’s opinion, is the negative stigma mobile and social games have acquired as a result of the tactics used in gaining virality. Although there are people who are happy to receive requests and notifications, the majority of people are not. He says, “Making these channels more approachable, without feeling like spam, will help a great deal.” He also sees mobile repeating some of the same mistakes of the first few generations of Facebook games, with lack of innovation and too much drive to clone competitors.

Grow The Community

At FunPlus, they are confronting this problem by creating games that are about more than sending requests to friends. They are making it about creating a global community of people who enjoy playing games. Zamara is also innovating in every way possible in the projects he is working on.

Image 8
FunPlus is making their games about creating a global community of people who enjoy playing games.

The next important trend he expects to come to the games industry is multiple platform play. He notes that a few games, like Candy Crush and Zynga Poker, have already shown the power of being able to play on almost any device and platform. So he expects AAA games to be launched with companion apps that extend and support the play experience. He emphasizes, “People already want to continue their gaming experience on whatever app they are using at the time. Hopefully, anyone making games today recognizes there is an audience growing that wants more than they are being offered now.”

Zamara says his two biggest passions are travel and food. In fact, he claims if he were not a game designer, he would be a chef because he loves to cook and eat all kinds of food. He also loves travel and has recently returned from his honeymoon in South Africa and Mozambique.

Lately, his gaming has consisted of playing Diablo 3, Hearthstone, League of Legends, and TitanFall; his platform of choice is PC. He also owns consoles, including 3DS for on-the-go gaming and an Xbox to play Rock Band with friends. And he feels the iPad and iPhone are the biggest consoles out there right now.

 

Studio Spotlight

Red Hot Labs: Sons of Zynga Forge Bridge to the Beyond

May 31, 2013 — by Vincent Carrella

feature32.jpg

Amitt Mahajan is on a mission, and it’s a dangerous one at that. You see Mahajan, and his partner Joel Poloney, are tight-rope walkers. They’ve strung their wire between the once lofty tower of social gaming on Facebook and the rapidly rising rocket ship of social-mobile. They’re walking that very narrow line between art and science as they attempt to leave one world behind, building on their early success at Zynga, to stake a claim in the new world beyond.

Founders of Red Hot Labs
Joel Poloney and Amitt Mahajan, founders of Red Hot Labs

But Red Hot Labs, newly founded by Mahajan and Poloney, is well-funded and well-poised to make such a crossing. After all, Poloney and Mahajan are the brains behind the Ville-games that provided Zynga with so much of its early zing. The question now is, just how hot is Red Hot? Building blockbuster franchises like Farmville and Castleville is incredibly difficult. But building a company that can create them is Sisyphean. Can its two young founders roll that huge boulder back up the hill? All signs point to Yes.

The lightbulb moment came for Mahajan during his stint as Zynga’s CTO in Japan. It was there, immersed in a society thoroughly inundated with mobile devices, that he saw the future.

“It made sense that when I came back to the US, we would try to get ahead of that curve here.”

“In Japan, I got a chance to see what a mobile first society looks like,” Mahajan said. “Everywhere you looked, people were utilizing their phones as their primary means of communication and entertainment. Every other TV commercial was for a social game, so I knew that it was only a matter of time before that phenomenon spread to the US… It made sense that when I came back to the US, we would try to get ahead of that curve here.”

Mahajan and Poloney knew they wanted to start a company, but their general thrust didn’t gel until they left Zynga. They saw promising potential in what was then still a nascent and evolving mobile landscape and formed Red Hot Labs as a sort of technology and know-how bridge between what worked in the old world of web-based social games and the new frontier of always-on, always-connected handheld devices.

Notes at Red Hot Labs“Our core belief is that the mobile ecosystem is still new and undeveloped,” Mahajan said. “The tools and infrastructure we had available when we were building games for Facebook does not yet exist for mobile and there is an opportunity in applying what we learned building FarmVille and other mass-market games at Zynga to mobile devices.”

Red Hot see gaps in the app development ecosystem. So they’re investing in their own core technology early, and taking their time doing it right, believing that will pay off down the road. Red Hot plans to create their own tools and services to fill those gaps that still exist, and that inhibit growth, in the mobile space as it pertains to app development. And their approach is both wise and humble. Having come off such success at Zynga, one might expect to find arrogance or even cockiness at Red Hot. Not so. Mahajan espouses a cyclical philosophy of perpetual learning that is almost Zen-like in its emphasis on leveraging the skills and talent of its people as both teachers and students.

“I measure our success in that regard by not only how successful we are when people are working with us, but how successful our alumni are even after they have left Red Hot Labs.”

“My aim is for Red Hot Labs to be a place of continuous learning,” Mahajan said. “Everyone here is a teacher and everyone here is a student. We aspire to work with people that inspire us to grow and do our best work. I measure our success in that regard by not only how successful we are when people are working with us, but how successful our alumni are even after they have left Red Hot Labs.”

Mahajan is serious about what he feels sets Red Hot apart. He sounds more like a University Dean than game studio CEO, but such a mindset is not altogether altruistic, it’s also good business. It’s like a brick-and-mortar store that prides itself on customer service except in this case, the employee is the customer. When a person feels respected and taken care of, that person not only works harder and more productively, but moves on with a positive and gracious attitude that yields dividends in the form of referrals, reviews and collaboration in the future.

Bingo Blast™, Red Hot’s first game, released on iOS and Android in March. It was featured on Google Play and, according to Mahajan, is doing very well. But it’s really only the beginning of what Red Hot has up its sleeve. It’s the technology beneath Bingo Blast that’s the real differentiator. Red Hot’s game-agnostic server architecture allows them to run multiple games on the same set of servers by employing some unique trade-offs in how data is stored and updated, enabling them to deploy games very quickly using their unique approach.

Though technology is a key component of Red Hot’s strategy, it’s game-play and brand loyalty they are most focused on. They are building processes around the collaboration between what Mahajan calls ‘intuition-based designers’ and metrics-driven product managers, leveraging what they learned at Zynga – both what did, and what didn’t work.

Working Hard
They are building processes around the collaboration between what Mahajan calls ‘intuition-based designers’ and metrics-driven product managers, leveraging what they learned at Zynga – both what did, and what didn’t work.

“We’re a retention-first company,” Mahajan says. “That means respecting the player and building a long-term relationship with them by delivering entertainment first. We’re always looking for win/win experiences where the player constantly experiences new unique types of fun and we are compensated for our efforts. It’s not always easy to do, but searching for those opportunities is what differentiates us and makes this an incredible adventure.”

Balancing the art and science of game development has been the mantra of many studios before them, but Red Hot seems to have the chops to actually pull it off. If they can achieve on mobile what they managed to do with Farmville in the now ancient social-Facebook past, we could be looking at the next Zynga…or perhaps, the next Zynga acquisition target.

logo
SUPPORTED BY