main

Belgrade 2014Live CoverageVideo Coverage

Julian Runge: “Analytics Matter, but Mainly After Great Game Design” | Casual Connect Video

November 21, 2014 — by Catherine Quinton

feature17.jpg

“Churn prediction works for casual games, or at least for engaged segments within your player base,” Julian Runge explained during his session at Casual Connect Eastern Europe 2014.

DOWNLOAD SLIDES

“Increasing fun through data is an exhilaratingly cool task and something that nobody relates to data. But the games industry makes it possible!” says Julian Runge, who leads Wooga’s analytics team.

In 2012, Julian began working for Wooga as an analyst on Monster World, Wooga’s largest simulation game on Facebook at the time. His background in statistics and economic thinking, as well as the experience he received through internships and starting a small company while still at school, have been enormously helpful in his work. Now he is responsible for advanced analytics across games and for marketing. He also coordinates the work of a team of four analysts “to set the right impulses and derive impact from data on design and bottom-line.”

MW_Intro_2
Julian began working for Wooga as an analyst on Monster World, Wooga’s largest simulation game on Facebook at the time.

Passion Produces Results

Julian’s inspiration for joining the games industry was, quite simply, his passion for gaming. On a day-to-day basis, his greatest motivation is the opportunity to work with equally passionate people and assist them in developing outstanding products. He had no desire to work for a company that did not have its own creative process. And, he maintains, “What is more creative and fun than game development?”

Along with passion, he is tremendously energized by working with data and generating insight and impact from them. Even in his free time, Julian enjoys playing with data. But in contrast to the intellectual and virtual aspects of his work life, one of his favorite free-time activities is using his hands to build things.

03.07.2014 Berlin Foto: Bernd Jaworek
Julian Runge, Senior Analyst, Wooga

It’s Unpredictable

In the future of the games industry, Julian sees predictive analytics becoming increasingly important, with huge implications for gameplay and marketing. He believes customized user experience will be the key success factor for gameplay. Customizing the gameplay will require adequately targeted offers, adaptive gameplay, and strategic cross-linking to other games.

Although he is personally excited about analytics and the potentially huge impact of big data on the games industry, he emphasizes that introspective game design is the key factor in success, saying, “Analytics matter, but mainly after great game design has happened.”

Office 4th_Founders
Julian emphasizes that introspective game design is the key factor in success.

What he finds most appealing about the industry: its inherent unpredictability. So the future can be expected to bring surprises, possibly in game mechanics and the use of new devices. But he would love to see more augmented reality, like, for example, Google’s Ingress. He also believes there is potential in using digital technology to advance direct interaction with the physical environment for gaming.

Gaming Convenience

When Julian is gaming, he prefers the convenience of mobile and considers Android as the platform of the future, especially when he factors in the Asia market. And he plays everywhere. One of the more unusual places was a speedboat in Thailand. He was trying out a Wooga release candidate on his waterproof Xperia Z1, but unfortunately, he relates, “The processor got so hot you could have fried an egg on it.”

GameJam-4
Game testing at Wooga

He concentrates on playing one or two games, usually an arcade game and another engaging game, and he plays them very intensely. Until recently, he had been focusing on Clash of Clans, but he has now deleted that app. Upgrading in the game had become ridiculously expensive, as he was to the point where it took six million elixir for level six archers and dragons. Currently, he is intensely playing a new, unreleased game from Wooga, claiming “It’s gonna be big!” At Casual Connect Eastern Europe, Julian advised everyone to “Watch for Wooga’s 2015 launches!” as well as the job opportunity of quantitative analyst for his team.

 

BusinessContributionsDevelopmentGame Audio ArtistryGame DevelopmentIndustryOnlineSpecials

Moving with the Latest Pendulum Swing: Right Before Our Eyes, Another Gaming Industry Transformation

April 4, 2014 — by Mariia Lototska

feature.jpg

Nick ThomasNick Thomas, CEO and Co-Founder of SomaTone, Inc., is a video games industry veteran and thought leader with 10+ years of proven executive leadership results with a focus on developing strategic industry partnerships, innovating creative outsourcing solutions and managing talented teams that contribute to more than 100 games annually from nearly all major publishers and developers, as well as independent developers. He discusses the transformation occurring in the industry in this article.


It’s happening again, right before our eyes; we’re in the midst of yet another era of redefinition and reinvention in the ever-evolving gaming industry. While the landscape is changing dramatically, history shows us that something new and good will invariably emerge. After all, (and despite many attempts), you cannot own or control creativity, or predict the future of gaming.

We at SomaTone are ten years deep as a leading provider of creative content for mobile, social, and casual games, working at the forefront of gaming over the last decade’s explosive growth. Having produced audio content on hundreds of games for many of the top publishers as well as for the indies, our vantage point gives us a sweeping perspective across the landscape of the games industry– from AAA console games, to MMO’s, to Social/Mobile, to Casual, and beyond.

We’re seeing the cyclical pendulum swing of innovation, homogenization, and reinvention continuing to keep the publishers of gaming content guessing as the smaller, faster, and more creative start-ups are yet again redefining the gaming industry.

Creative comrades in the face of an ever-changing industry
Creative comrades in the face of an ever-changing industry, SomaTone’s Nick Thomas with Tap4Fun CEO Kevin Yang at GDC 2014

The Ripple Effects of Converting Players into Users in Mobile Gaming

Casual games continue to go through a familiar pattern, and we are currently emerging from a decline of the smaller “Mom and Pop” game developers, who have been squeezed out by the realities of mobile publishing and the dominance of Free-to-Play (F2P) games. This economic model has sought to systematically convert game “users” into a currency that has been hoarded, sold, and traded in an effort to control access to “game players.”

As a consequence, the industry was stratified into large game publishers–who controlled the access to “users” and thus the majority of the market–and new start-ups and Indies, who were either being gobbled up by these same publishers, or self-publishing and hoping for a Flappy Bird-style anomalous hit.

The middle-class of game development–studios of 20-50 working on games that were sold via standard pay-to-play standards with supportive publishing partners–has suffered. With limited access to users, who are carefully controlled by game publishers, it was nearly impossible for mid-sized independent game developers to make and sell their own games and support their teams. The result was a polarized and stratified industry in which a small fraction of game publishers own the vast majority of market, making it extremely difficult for small game developers to independently make and sell their games without yielding to the requirements of the publishers, who will own the IP, take the lion’s share of the revenue, with no clear obligation to bring “users” to their game.

“Every time the industry has homogenized itself by the few having control of the many, a new era of gaming has invented itself.”

Now while all publisher models attempt to control access and distribution to customers (this is in fact what publishers are supposed to do), there is a dramatic new variable at play, with the F2P economy. This “race to the bottom” business model, which has led to disruptive game-play mechanics designed to extract fees from “users”, in their efforts to enjoy a fully featured game-play experience and be “players”, is highly dependent on publishers’ access to users, and their ability to monetize these users. Those “old school” game designers, who sought to develop great games, that offered fully featured immersive game-play experiences at the outrageously expensive price of $.99, never stood a chance against “free” games, which are developed by game publishers and promoted to their “users”, requiring players to pay for the features included in a 1-dollar competing title.

This Latest Cycle Will Induce a Painful Rebirth

This cycle of innovation, homogenization and reinvention is not a new trend. We have seen this same cycle in gaming in the past, with Big Fish Games‘ consolidation of the PC Downloadable market and subsequently, Zynga‘s dominance of browser-based Facebook, and in both cases, there was a painful rebirth of the industry. Those fastest to adapt to the new ecosystems survived, and those who could not evolve, died away.

However, it is also true that every time the industry has homogenized itself by the few having control of the many, a new era of gaming has invented itself. Just after Big Fish unequivocally took control of PC downloadable, Facebook came along and completely disrupted their reign. A few short years later, the kings of Facebook (Zynga, Playdom, Wooga) have been dethroned, only to be replaced by the current leaders of the mobile industry. With each successive attempt to control and “own” the industry, new life has begun.

“You cannot control game players or ‘own’ creativity. A new era is currently percolating under the thin crust of the mobile/casual games ecosystem, and by my observations, we are onto a new dawn of gaming.”

This reminds me of Jurassic Park. Life finds a way. In this case, creativity finds a way, and despite the attempts of the current reign of publishers to own and control this inherently creative marketplace, they are discovering, just as all others before them have, that you cannot control game players or “own” creativity.

A new era is currently percolating under the thin crust of the mobile/casual games ecosystem, and by my observations, we are onto a new dawn of gaming. One in which King.com, and Kabam, or perhaps even the Apple Store and Google Play store, will soon find themselves trying to catch up, and wondering what happened as the world they felt so sure of has shifted beneath their feet.

“Mom and Pop” developers, take heart. The pendulum swings both ways. And from our vantage point, which reaches from the largest publishers to the smallest indies, the playing field is leveling.

2014 will be a year of reorganization and consolidation, as the bubble of Mobile/Social games refocuses its efforts, and quality will retake its place as the leading factor in a company’s success, rather than simply a publisher’s control of access to users. And developing innovative and high-quality games has always been what the “Mom and Pop” game studios have done best and are continuing to do.

Look forward to the next installment of this series next month, a case study on Zynga’s Puzzle Charms!

 

Europe 2014Video Coverage

Casual Connect Europe 2014: A Sweet Homecoming

March 10, 2014 — by Clelia Rivera

feature8.jpg

This year was a sweet homecoming for Casual Connect Europe as it returned to the city where it all started: Amsterdam. It may have started with only a few hundred attendees back in 2006, but this time, about 2000 game industry professionals gathered in the beautiful Beurs van Berlage for three days to create new connections and learn more about the industry’s current trends. Over 120 lectures were presented by international speakers from companies such as Wooga, Youtube, Facebook, Google, and GamePoint. Lectures included information useful for the current game market, such as Godus creator Peter Molyneux‘s session on design re-invention, new technology, and mobile development.

Casual Connect isn’t just about the handy lectures, but also the professional relationships that are built through meeting and sharing with close to 1000 other companies in attendance. Whether during the day at the show or the sponsored parties at night, there is always the opportunity to reach out and help foster the growth of the game industry community. This was true not only for the seasoned veterans, but new developers as well. Over 100 indie developers displayed their work at the Indie Prize Showcase held at Casual Connect Europe. In addition, 13 teams won various awards, from Most Innovative Game to Best in Show. The winners can be viewed on the Indie Prize website.

Indie Prize Winners
The Winners of Casual Connect Europe 2014’s Indie Prize Showcase

Looking forward to returning to Amsterdam next year, Casual Connect is currently focusing on the preparations for Casual Connect Asia, held in Singapore May 20 – 22, 2014. Check out the conference website if you are interested in more information: http://asia.casualconnect.org/

If you were not able to make it to Casual Connect Europe (or if you want to relive fond memories), videos of the presentation are available for free on Gamesauce and the conference website.

Casual Connect Europe Videos on Gamesauce:
Erik Goossens: Indie Developers and Advertising
Vicenç Marti: Community First
Inna Zaichenko: A Passion for Games
Scott Foe’s Evil Hilarity
Sebastien Borget on Educational Social Gaming
Yaniv Nizan: Don’t be Afraid to Win
Chris Natsuume: Making a Difference
Robert Winkler: Standing out with Substance
Cristi Badea: Opportunity for All, Even Underdogs
Teut Weidemann: Understanding Why Equals Win

More video articles can be found here.

Other Coverage of Casual Connect Europe:
 7 upcoming indie treats from Casual Connect 2014 in Amsterdam – Pocketgamer.co.uk
Video: Evil Game Design Challenge winner pitches F2P Evil Minecraft – Gamasutra
5 things we learned at Casual Connect Europe 2014 – Pocketgamer.biz
The DeanBeat: Developers need platforms that aren’t always in flux – Gamesbeat
14. Februar: Casual Games Association zeichnet Indie Games aus; Microsoft muss Schlüsselpositionen neu besetzen – Making Games
What Games Are: Going Small – TechCrunch
Spil Games will trigger ads at ‘cliffhanger moments’ in games by indie developers – Gamesbeat
Casual Connect Europe mit neuem Besucherrekord – Gamesindustry.biz
Mobile game Shapist was inspired by ancient Asian block games – Gamesbeat
GameDuell: “Spielerbindung deutlich gesteigert” – Gamesindustry.biz
If you want to score a good publisher, you need to think like a publisher – Pocketgamer.biz
Nextpeer makes it easy to challenge your friends in mobile multiplayer matches – Gamesbeat
Molyneux: “Geld zu verlangen ist kein Recht. Man muss es rechtfertigen.” – Gamesindustry.biz
Casual Connect feiert in Amsterdam erfolgreichen Neuanfang – Gamesmarkt
Is Christmas losing its sparkle? Flurry points to drop off in yuletide download growth – Pocketgamer.biz
The Dutch want gaming startups to sprout like tulips (interview) – Gamesbeat
Casual Connect 2014 • Drie Nederlandse winnaars bij Indie Prize award show – Control
Portrait of a Pretentious Game – Rappler
Casual Connect 2014 • De succesfactoren van Reus, de godgame met een indieprijskaartje – Control
Grand Cru: Console devs are ‘utterly failing’ at in-app purchases – Pocketgamer.biz
Game makers beware: Virtual goods purchases are about to be regulated – Gamesbeat
Casual Connect 2014 • Een bedrijf opstarten doet niemand voor je, vergeet niet te relaxen en wees een ster – Control
Asian companies account for nine of the top 10 game mergers and acquisitions – Gamesbeat
The Godus amongst us: Molyneux talks free-to-play farces, winning without chasing whales and his top score on Flappy Bird – Pocketgamer.biz
Peter Molyneux believes ripping people off with free-to-play games won’t last (interview) – Gamesbeat
Size matters: How to scale your game for overnight success – Pocketgamer.biz
FlowPlay helps developers like Joju Games differentiate their social-casino titles – Gamesbeat
Molyneux: Free-to-play is like ‘smashing consumers over the head with a sledgehammer’ – Pocketgamer.biz
Dandelions benoemd tot beste indiegame Casual Connect – Gamer.nl
Share and share like: Why developers need to care about their sharers – Pocketgamer.biz
Mimimi gewinnt Indie Prize – GamesMarkt
Flappy Bird was the perfect accidental guerilla marketing campaign, says Creative Mobile – Pocketgamer.biz
Casual Connect Amsterdam – Freegame.cz
Mech Mocha Founder Arpita Kapoor Wins Most Prominent Female Indie Award at Casual Connect Europe – Animation Xpress
Casual Connect Europe 2014 – Амстердам – ITC.ua

 

Video Coverage

Katia Vara: Leveraging Global Experience | Casual Connect Video

October 25, 2013 — by Catherine Quinton

feature5.jpg

Katia Vara shared the experience of releasing a lot of game content on a weekly basis during Casual Connect Kyiv 2013.

Vara's knowledge of the world, and of how to deliver top-notch content, allows her to find the cost-effective, yet high-quality solutions wherever they are and match them with the right processes to deliver the necessary results.
Vara’s knowledge of the world, and of how to deliver top-notch content, allows her to find the cost-effective, yet high-quality solutions wherever they are and match them with the right processes to deliver the necessary results.

At Wooga, Katia Vara works with Product Leads on all their production needs, including outsourcers, licensing, and methodologies. She has always been sensitive to people’s needs, an attribute which is of great value in her work, allowing her to find better solutions and the improvements they require. Her knowledge of the world, and of how to deliver top-notch content, allows her to find the cost-effective, yet high-quality solutions wherever they are and match them with the right processes to deliver the necessary results.

Throughout this, Vara learned, “Whenever I have a personal or professional objective, no matter how hard or far away it may be, I know I can reach it with patience and motivation.”

New Technologies and Usage Patterns

At Wooga’s Adventure Studio, they focus on games that create deep immersion and an emotional experience; for example, Pearl’s Peril, where the story is at the center of the game.

Vara considers that the rise of alternative smartphone usage will greatly impact the company over the next several years. She points to using smartphones and tablets as controller devices for sports games on consoles. She also sees the potential effect of the new alternative reality devices, such as the Occulus Rift, as they can expand consumer perceptions and the breadth of experiences that content creators can deliver.

At Wooga’s Adventure Studio, they focus on games that create deep immersion and an emotional experience. An example of this is Pearl’s Peril, where the story is at the center of the game. For the future, they will need to integrate the potential of these new technologies prior to prototyping.

Although Vara does not believe there is a single trend that will greatly influence the games industry as a whole, the new technologies, combined with great minds and opportunities will definitely affect the future.

Office
Wooga is always focusing on games

Travel Leads to Discovery

When she is not involved with her work, Vara still participates in the industry through playing console and casual browser games with her husband, who is also a producer. She travels extensively, enjoying seeing new places, meeting with friends, and visiting her widespread family. She also enjoys walking in the woods with her dog. She listens to rock music, a preference she developed in her teen years, stating, “I like the fact that you can mix different genres with rock and easily convey emotion.”

Video Coverage

Antti Hattara on the Challenge of Creating Free-to-Play | Casual Connect Video

August 6, 2013 — by Catherine Quinton

feature32.jpg

During his session at Casual Connect USA, Hattara stated, “Replayability is an indicator of meaningful choice.”

DOWNLOAD SLIDES

“Many game genres will be reinvented for the tablet, as bigger touch screens allow more advanced and intuitive ways to interact with games.”

 

Antti Hattara
Antti Hattara

Antti Hattara is Head of Studio at Wooga, where he works with Product Leads to develop free-to-play games from concept to live service. If he was not involved in the game industry, he imagines himself with a future in sports tracking. He intended to become a management consultant, but it wasn’t meant to be.

Work and Play

When Antti studied programming at university, his projects all ended up being games, including Java Applet Air Hockey, Asteroids for early Symbian, and 3D Tetris with open GL. He was made to work on games. He started working as a game engineer for Sumea Studio in Helsinki. The company was acquired by Digital Chocolate in 2004. He claims working there was “seven years of fun, with eight different titles, and eight different business cards.” Then he made the move to Berlin to work as Wooga’s Head of Studio. “Sticking with what you enjoy is an easy decision,” he says.

When Antti has time away from work, he enjoys swimming, cycling, and running long distances, as well as exploring the playgrounds of Berlin with his two sons, ages 2 months and 2 ½ years. It is no wonder he describes himself as energetic.

The Challenges of Changing

Antti
“Many game genres will be reinvented for the tablet, as bigger touch screens allow more advanced and intuitive ways to interact with games.”

Antti tells us the greatest challenge in his career was changing from the paid mobile games model to free-to-play Facebook games. It requires more than just changing development. The process required that he establish the Product Manager role and then build the team. Once that was done, he needed to get the cooperation of free-to-play experts and traditional designers working in the Helsinki Studio.

During his session at Casual Connect USA, he goes over how you can evaluate prototypes to recognize which have hit potential.

The Future is Tablet

The biggest trend Antti sees coming in the next several years in the games industry is the tablet. His reasoning is that it reaches the mass market and can also serve the core gamer audience well. He believes, “Many game genres will be reinvented for the tablet, as bigger touch screens allow more advanced and intuitive ways to interact with games.” At Wooga, they are working hard to prototype revolutionary new ways to interact with games on the touch screen.

Video Coverage

Timo Dries: I Believe In Love and Passion | Casual Connect Video

February 13, 2013 — by Catherine Quinton

wooga_timo.jpg
“Love and passion are the reasons I go to work each day. This is something worth sharing.”

Timo Dries, Super Product Manager at Wooga, has attended many presentations over the past few years. “I have heard presentations on numbers, on KPIs and on measuring everything. But only once have I heard a presentation discussing love and passion,” Dries recalls, “Love and passion are the reasons I go to work each day: love for my team and passion for the product. This is something worth sharing.”

DOWNLOAD SLIDES

An unquestionable, unstoppable passion for games

WOOGA's TIMO
“It doesn’t need high end 3D graphics or symphony orchestras; Super Bomberman 2 inspired me from the beginning, and after 15 years, dropping bombs still gives me goose bumps.”

Timo Dries is a long time game enthusiast whose passion for games comes through loud and clear. He became excited about video games in the 1990s, and he hasn’t stopped playing since. His preferred console is the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, with Super Bomberman 2 as an example of the most nearly perfect game mechanic. “It doesn’t need high end 3D graphics or symphony orchestras; Super Bomberman 2 inspired me from the beginning, and after 15 years, dropping bombs still gives me goose bumps,” he says with a gleam in his eye.

Wooga Games Team
“Wooga’s importance to the games industry ecosystem stems from its position as the first company to make money from virtual magic wands and virtual rainbow goo!”

Questionable companions…and rainbow goo

“I didn’t even know exactly what this job would be,” remembers Dries, “but was intrigued at the idea of monsters working on a farm.”

While he was at university, he began working for Nickelodeon, where he met Stephanie Kaiser. A few weeks later, she left to begin work at a tiny company few had ever heard of, with the unpronounceable name of Wooga. A year later, Dries was ready for a new adventure when Stephanie offered him a job at Wooga. “I didn’t even know exactly what this job would be,” remembers Dries,” but was intrigued at the idea of monsters working on a farm.” Timo jokes, “Wooga’s importance to the games industry ecosystem stems from its position as the first company to make money from virtual magic wands and virtual rainbow goo!” He claims his proudest professional moment was high-fiving Ryan Henson Creighton (creator, with his daughter, of Sissy’s Magical Popcorn Adventure), after giving a talk at Casual Connect Seattle.

The future according to Timo

As Dries looks toward the future, he hopes developers will take full advantage of the possibilities the new mobile devices are opening up. As he says, “It is not enough to just port browser or console games to an iPhone without really taking care to rethink the game for that device.” Such things as shaking, moving and twisting the devices offer endless opportunities to create in new ways.


Photo Downloads
WOOGA's TIMO
WOOGA's TIMO
Wooga Games Team
Wooga Games Team

Video Coverage

Jens Begemann of Wooga: We Are Entering a New Era for Games | Casual Connect Video

February 13, 2013 — by Catherine Quinton

K1024_edited_GruppeAlle-7-600x400.jpg

To a standing room only crowd at Casual Connect Europe 2013 in Hamburg, Jens Begemann, founder and CEO of Wooga in Berlin, discussed how we make games and the devices we make them for, questioning the dominance of traditional platforms. “What is required to make tablets the best game machines ever made,” began Jens. The direction we are heading in now, according to Begemann, is away from the keyboard, mouse and gamepad controls of old and toward touch controls that will have a drastic impact on game design.

DOWNLOAD SLIDES

Everyone wants to play; it is a natural part of being human.

“We are entering a new era for games,” he say. “Every fifteen years or so a new input technology becomes mass market and, with that, new ideas and new genres follow.” By way of example, he points out the game pad and the mouse resulted in the creation of completely new genres such as jump-n-run and hidden object games. “The same thing will happen as developers create games specifically for touch, rather than adapting genres created for older control methods.”

A successful leader looks for something new

In 2009 Jens was looking for a new challenge. He had just left Jamba, where he had worked since 2001, helping it grow from a small start up to its position as Europe’s leading provider of mobile entertainment.

Begemann kept the mass market in mind, with a vision to bring games to the same level as music or video.

Begemann had always been interested in games, even coding a few while in his teens, but what really piqued his curiosity was the question of why video games hadn’t gone completely mainstream. As he says, “If you asked someone on the street if they listened to music or watched video or TV every day, you’d get a clear “yes” from everyone. But if you asked them if they played games, more often than not, they would say their children or grandchildren played but they did not.” He was inspired to get into the games industry to change that situation.

When founding Wooga, Begemann kept the mass market in mind, with a vision to bring games to the same level as music or video, with everyone playing every day. Begemann knows that everyone wants to play; it is a natural part of being human. Over the past twenty years the games industry has grown exponentially, yet there are still many people who are not playing games. He wants to reach this audience by bringing out games with greater depth, teaching them to play in new and interesting ways.

Wooga now has artists, engineers, game designers and office staff from forty different countries all working together under one roof. And for Jens that is something really special.
Wooga now has artists, engineers, game designers and office staff from forty different countries all working together under one roof. And for Jens that is something really special.

Wooga HQ – A very special place

Begemann recalls launching Wooga’s first game, Brain Buddies, as a wonderful moment. However, as he looks at the company from today’s perspective, he believes his greatest accomplishment has been bringing together so many people from all over the world. Wooga now has artists, engineers, game designers and office staff from forty different countries all working together under one roof. And for him that is something really special.

This is a very fast paced industry, so it is essential to be open to both change and failure.

As Begemann considers the factors shaping his approach to his work, he reminds us that this is a very fast paced industry, so it is essential to be open to both change and failure and to benefit from the lessons they can provide. At Wooga, they constantly revise their approach to game creation. For that first game, they began with a 100 page game design document before writing a line of code. But now they begin with the person who will be responsible for the game, not with the idea. That person is given considerable freedom, with the last word on all decisions affecting the game. They will then do prototyping for months, gathering feedback until they are sure they are on the right track.


Photo Downloads
Bubble Island

Wooga Team

Diamond Dash

Wooga Game

logo
SUPPORTED BY