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Mind the Trap: How To Engage Those Who Haven’t Played Yet

August 15, 2016 — by Kenneth Ng of Dissonance Entertainment

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The majority of people buying your game are consumers, not developers. - Kenneth Ng.Click To Tweet

During the last weeks of July, our team of Dissonance Entertainment has been hit by a whirlwind of exciting events. Mind the Trap won the Best Multiplayer Game award and was nominated for Best Game Design at the Casual Connect 2016 trade fair. In addition to that, we locked in meetings with publishers, got approached by freelancers and marketers, got the game Greenlit after nine days on Steam, and for the first time had a post hit the front page of Reddit with over 7000 up-votes.


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Hyperdrive Massacre: For a Huge Couch and Lots of Friends

August 12, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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The goal was to grow and learn while doing game development and foster the growth of a local gamedev…Click To Tweet

34BigThings is one of the biggest indie game studios in Italy. Founded in 2013 and self-sustained throughout, they launched their first game Hyperdrive Massacre in 2015, while working on their much more ambitious futuristic racer Redout. The team’s lead game designer Giuseppe Enrico Franchi shares the story. 


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Blades of Revenge: Let the AI Test

August 12, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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Infinity Levels Studio, the winner of Indie Prize Best Mobile Game nomination at Casual Connect USA 2016, is a small Thai-based games studio that focuses on building differentiated gameplay and amazing artwork. Coming from a not-so well-known place to produce innovative mobile games, and due to the competitive nature of the category, Nikki Assavathorn, the head of the studio, was pretty sure they wouldn’t win anything. So she sat at the back of the room and didn’t realize her studio has won the award, and only an hour later, when she chatted with the other gamers, she found out that Blades of Revenge has won.


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Shield of God: Story Defined by Genre

August 10, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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A New Age 3D strategy game made in China… Wait! MADE IN CHINA? Typically, anything made in China smells suspicious… In mobile it’s about some biased comments including but not limited to copying, out-of-line translation, not very user-friendly and so-much-text UI, etc. When Gunship Studio positioned themselves as the 3D game studio targeting overseas market, they chose a hard path… Yes Games is a mobile game developer founded in 2011. Gunship is one of the six studios under it. Unlike others who got famous IP support from Toei Animations (such as Dragon Ball and One Piece), Gunship has spent more than 12 months finding out what kind of game they want to make. The end result is Shield of God, whose story is told by the company’s overseas business director Amy Ho


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How to Get and Keep my Attention as an Indie Prize Judge

August 9, 2016 — by Mike Hines of Amazon

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Congratulations! You are building a great game, and you’ve decided to enter it into an Indie Prize competition! While you apply, it’s important to remember that in some competitions, you’ll be one of hundreds of games that will be evaluated by judges at the beginning of the contest, and your goal is to be noticed, stand out, and reduce any friction between the judges and playing your game.


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Understanding Chinese Gaming: Seven Asian MMORPGs That Changed Gaming in China

August 8, 2016 — by Luke Stapley, Chinese Game Market Consultant

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Nihao! Hello and welcome to China! Most game developers in the mobile space are starting to branch out and look to other markets. There’s been some strong interest in China. With over a billion people and about 400 million smartphones being used in China according to IDC, most developers are drooling over the idea of making a game for the Chinese market. Consultant for the Chinese game market Luke Stapley tells more. 


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Demon Archive: Recurrence of Dr. Faustus and Fantastic Elements

August 4, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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Founded in 2014, La Calade Games is merely composed by the couple at the beginning. As a player of roleplaying games, co-founder and CEO Shirley Cheng was excited to see so many hidden object games with amazing animations and stories on iPad during 2012. She remembers her first time playing these games on iPad: being really impressed, especially when the games were inspired by some classic works. One day Shirley’s husband saw her playing those hidden object games and wondered why she was so obsessed with them. Eventually he realized those were truly interesting, and considered making one, since he’s always had a dream to make his own game. Shirley tells more of the story of the award-winning game that has been honored for Best Narrative at Casual Connect Asia 2016. 


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New Industry Report Reveals that Only 2 out of 10 Game Downloads Retain Users after 30 Days

July 26, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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By Connie Hwong, global content marketing director at Verto Analytics

Whether you’re a big-time game publisher or indie, the challenges that every mobile game developer faces are the same: acquiring users and keeping their attention well past download. It’s simple to say but hard to do: less than 20 percent of all game downloads result in active users after 30 days.

Even with real-time data and sophisticated mobile analytics, how many mobile gaming industry insiders really know what’s working well? Almost all game developers struggle to answer these questions:

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Finding (and Acting on) the White Spaces in Mobile Gaming

July 23, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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There’s no doubt that the mobile games market is growing—even before the debut of Pokemon Go. Not only are more people playing on smartphones and tablets, but they’re dedicating increasingly more time and money as well. To grab a bigger share of this growth, developers and publishers need to target the right consumers with the right content. The first step in achieving this insight is understanding the past and future landscape of the mobile games space by addressing two core questions: Where is this growth coming from? and Where will growth come from next?
With these questions in mind, Nielsen Games recently analyzed its data on mobile gamers and their thoughts on hundreds of the top mobile games to provide industry-level insight into growth patterns. Manager Julia Valchanova and Senior Analyst Ian O’Neil share the learnings.


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