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Exclusive InterviewsIndie

Danilo Dias: Mashing Out 8-Bit Joy

September 30, 2016 — by David Radd

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Joymasher is the developer of Oniken and Odallus, two pixel-art titles inspired by various NES action games. The developer is based out of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The studio is led by Danilo Dias, his wife Thaís Weiller and their friend Marco Galvão. When they started out, Danilo confirmed that they weren’t operating under the mentality of making an “indie” game.
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“Well, to be honest at the time I started making Oniken I didn’t even knew what an indie game was!” said Danilo, laughing. “I just wanted to make a fun action 8-bit game, like the ones that I used to play as a kid. Every time that I think about making a game, I ask myself, ‘Hum… I think that I want to make a Contra-like game, or a Castlevania-like game’ and so on. I know that this isn’t something refined or creative but I really love games from 8/16-bit era and I want to make games like these.”

Exclusive InterviewsIndie

Abdullah Alsayed: Hopping to Indie Prize with Pix Hop

September 21, 2016 — by David Radd

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Run Double Jump is an indie gaming gathering (organized by 2024 Studios and the IGDA) that takes place every year in Egypt. It aims to encourage indie developers, expose their games, and to help the industry in the MENA region flourish and grow rapidly.
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The event showcases some of the best indie games in the region for gamers to play and test. In addition to Indie Games Exhibit, there are a bunch of sessions presented by pioneering local indie developers.

RDJ helps indie developers to share their experiences and success stories as well as the obstacles that faces them in their careers. Also, gamers will get to discover these games developed and produced by indie developers, and increase general awareness surrounding these titles. This networking will help boost the regional gaming industry.

This year, RDJ partnered with Indie Prize – Casual Connect for a contest between the submitted games. The game selected “best in show” will be able to take part in Indie Prize Berlin – that winner was Abdullah Alsayed of BNOO Games for the title Pix Hop.

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DevelopmentExclusive InterviewsGame DevelopmentIndiePR & Marketing

Party Hard: Community-Driven Updates

September 16, 2016 — by Orchid

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The Ukrainian team of Pinokl Games team was working on a huge ambitious project of Mecha Titans and some other casual and family-friendly games… and then got tired of that all. They unleashed their darkest thoughts and participated in Kanobu Game Jam with Party Hard, a game of a bloody massacre at a noisy neighbors’ party at 3AM, or “third-person urban conflict simulator” as they describe their creation.

The bloodthirsty theme found a response in the hearts of Casual Connect Europe 2015 critics, having brought the team the Critics Choice award in Indie Prize. The team recently celebrated the 1st anniversary of Party Hard launch, having scored numerous other awards and gaining a massive creative fan base. Pinokl Games’ marketing manager and producer Alina Husevyk shares the most noticeable learnings of the year.


Exclusive InterviewsIndie

Jammin’ on Bolt Riley with Creator Oded Sharon

August 26, 2016 — by David Radd

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Five years in the making, Bolt Riley: A Reggae Adventure Game was recently released. Set in Jamaica in the 1970s, it tells the story of the titular main character who wants to become a reggae star. Bolt Riley is a point-and-click adventure game set in the Caribbean with a soundtrack tinged with local flavor, which despite the different subject matter and time period, is evocative of the seminal Monkey Island series. Creator Oded Sharon is open in saying that Monkey Island is an inspiration for the Bolt Riley game.

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“Yes, I’m a huge fan of both Monkey Island and its creator Ron Gilbert. In fact, Monkey Island is the game that inspired me the most when becoming a game developer,” said Oded. “I was actually one of the first people online to do a crowdfunding campaign, a joke website called ‘Buy a car for Ron Gilbert’ which raised money to buy Ron Gilbert a car.  We ended up raising enough money to actually buy Ron a toy car which I gave to him at GDC 2008.”

DevelopmentExclusive InterviewsIndie

Rasheed Abu-Eideh: Bringing the Shadows of War to Light

June 11, 2016 — by David Radd

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Liyla and the Shadows of War is a game that wasn’t made with profit in mind. It’s a free mobile game, and one that has a serious message to it about the 2014 Israel–Gaza conflict.

The game was recently the winner of Reboot Develop Indie Award in category of “Visual Excellence”. It was also nominated for Best in Show & Most Innovative Game and Best Game Narrative for ‪Indie Prize at Casual Connect Asia 2016. But talking to Rasheed Abu-Eideh, the creator of Liyla and the Shadows of War, it was not a easy road to the game’s release.

DevelopmentExclusive InterviewsIndieOnline

Defold for a Mobile Spin-Off: Developer’s Perspective

June 11, 2016 — by Orchid

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In order to test Defold on “outside” devs other than King, their team gave early access to a Swedish indie developer Johan Hogfeldt and his team of Hammarhaja AB, whose game is called Hammerwatch Coliseum. King’s CTO Thomas Hartwig says this developer helped them define the community they wanted to build around Defold. While working on the game, Johan was sharing his feedback, and his game has already been released on iOS. After the show Gamesauce reached out to Johan to check out his impressions from the engine.


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Leveraging Community So People Care About Your Game

May 22, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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Leveraging Community So People Care About Your Game: 4 ways to generate interest in your game outside of traditional news

by Kenny Johnston of Pocket Gems

Getting people excited about your mobile game is hard work. Whether it’s press, streamers or some unlucky bystander that you’ve cornered at a bus stop, people often just don’t care. This can be a sobering experience for someone who’s poured their blood, sweat and tears into a game only to see it fall on glazed eyes and deaf ears. This is also the main reason why so many developers you meet have that haunted sporadic eye twitch that’s usually reserved for DMV workers and bomb squads.

But you know what’s 100 times harder than getting someone to notice your game when it launches? Getting someone to care about your game after it launches. Even if you have a roadmap chalk full of updates, nerfs, buffs, new characters and customizable skins, pitching a game that’s already launched often feels like trying to get Miley Cyrus to go to prom with you (but with less press coverage). Without product updates, this gets even more challenging. Most PR will generally tell you to focus on momentum like revenue, downloads, and in-game metrics. However, in today’s landscape everyone outside of your competitors will still usually receive this with a symphony of yawns and eye rolls.

Exclusive InterviewsIndieStudio Spotlight

Gert-Jan Stolk: Feeling the Need for Speed

May 8, 2016 — by David Radd

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SpeedRunners recently sprinted across the finish line to a full release after five years in development. It’s been a long process, but after a few years using Steam Green Light, awards from SXSW and Indie DB and various play-throughs by famous YouTubers, it’s now fully released for Steam, with an Xbox One release coming later.

We talked with Gert-Jan Stolk of DoubleDutch Games about SpeedRunners. They detail how publisher tinyBuild helped with the game’s aesthetic, how SpeedRunners eventually became an eSport and why indie developers should have a back up plan because their first game probably won’t be profitable.

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Shelley LK: Gaming the Top Talent in the World

April 7, 2016 — by David Radd

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Online platforms make launching a game to a worldwide audience easier than ever. It’s also possible now for a developer to come from any country and make a game that makes a huge splash in every region. With this in mind, IPC Ventures has launched their Gaming Top Talent competition, designed to draw in the best young developers of online mobile games.  The first batch of submissions will conclude on April 20, 2016.

Gamesauce spoke with Shelley LK, managing partner at IPC Ventures, during the post-GDC period and talked at length about the importance of industry events, challenges within the mobile industry, and how young developers will approach Gaming Top Talent, from application to the finale.

DevelopmentIndie

Growing Pains: Indie Developer JOY Entertainment Discovers Success and Lessons

March 16, 2016 — by Casey Rock

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JOY-logo-720x582Starting your own company is a learning experience for everyone. The founders of JOY Entertainment are no exception. The indie studio first formed in 2012 with the goal of bringing high quality games and joy to players everywhere – but the road to success is often paved with hard-learned lessons.

Initially, the founders all worked at Gameloft SEA while focusing on their indie studio part time. While they all have history working on big mobile titles, co-founder and CEO Le Giang Anh says not devoting all attention on the new studio was a fatal mistake. In order to really make a quality game, Anh recommends focusing 100 percent of your efforts to your indie project.

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