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How to Become the Next Big Thing in Video Gaming

February 14, 2017 — by Industry Contributions

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By Hiro Taylor, Founder of HeroPay

Take it from me, starting a business can be hard. There are hundreds of things to think about and while you’re thinking about those hundreds of things, another thousand or so will come to mind. Being an entrepreneur is really a 24/7 job and it can be a total roller coaster ride. You’ve secured funding: yay! You’ve missed your target client acquisition number: **tears**.

At HeroPay, we’ve created a platform that gives business owners the ability to compare different credit card processors. We’ve experienced many of the ups and downs, the flips and dips of starting a business, so now is the time for a road map of the awesome tools available to all types of entrepreneurs!

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Keep Your Friends Close, and Your Enemies Away From the Nice China

January 3, 2017 — by Industry Contributions

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By Nicole Canovas, Creative Content Intern at Mega Cat Studios

I’m about to relay to you the story of one of the most vivid gaming memories I have. It’s a tale of suspense. It’s a take of betrayal. It’s a tale of teens. I can’t remember the year, but the game was Mario Party and the system was Nintendo64. I was maybe 18 at the time, my younger sister and our mutual best friend maybe 16. It’s our friend’s turn, and he lands on the coveted Star Space. Toad jumps up and down, asking if he would like to purchase a star for 20 coins. The rest seems to happen in slow motion.

My sister’s hand snaps out and hits the joystick on our friend’s controller down- right as he’s pressing “A”. I had never been so proud and terrified of my little sister at the same time. Our friend looks at her, slack jawed, as his character declines the star. It was completely silent for about a minute before all hell broke loose.

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Should Social Casinos Be Regulated Like Real Money Online Casinos?

December 19, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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By Brian Hemmings

Social gaming has been an interesting innovation for the gambling industry, with many gambling operators finding profitable sidelines in social games. Operating in a similar way to real money online casinos, they offer a variety of games for players to participate in, generally with some social reward or points tally in return for successful gameplay.

mobile-casinoUnlike online casinos, social games differ in a number of key ways. They don’t tend to offer a straight financial reward, like you’d expect from winning a blackjack hand. But they do still often accept deposits from players, and use this to fund play which translates into social awards. These games are money spinners for social casino operators, and are proving increasingly popular with certain player demographics.

As an innovative twist on the established online gambling model, there are invariably questions about how this should be interpreted legally. Should these social games, which still take payment from players, be considered as gambling, and regulated accordingly? Or are they better regulated as non-gambling games?

With the rise of social gaming, the Gambling Commission looked into this issue, publishing a white paper on social gaming in 2015. It identified three potential risks from social gaming – Problem Gambling (i.e. individuals spending too much money on these games), Transitional Risks (i.e. increased likelihood of participation by young people in real money gambling) and Consumer Risks (i.e. scams through social gaming platforms). Let’s tackle each of these in turn, and see whether the same regulation as applies to gambling may be required for social gaming.

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Game of Zones: How to Conquer Every Crowd

December 8, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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By: Adi Haddad, Head of Marketing at Ilyon

Not quite friends, but certainly not enemies, the United States and China have vastly different cultures – but despite that, both sides try their best to trade and promote their country’s products and technologies in each other’s markets. Some American brands – like Apple, Coca Cola – have done well in China, while several Chinese brands, like Huawei and ZTE, are recognized by American consumers for their technology, not just the low prices that Chinese products are usually associated with.

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Bubble Shooter dragon background

But there have been far more misses than hits for both in the other side’s markets – especially in technology. Ebay, for example, has struggled in the Far East, while WeChat, the Chinese all-around chat and e-commerce app, has yet to make inroads in the US. Why? Both missed important cultural or usage cues that consumers in each country were looking for. Chinese consumers preferred local online auction apps because they allowed them to instantly communicate with sellers (something eBay didn’t offer), while in the US, WeChat failed (or chose not) to make deals with other app makers or services like it has done in China. As a result, American WeChat users remained in the closed environment of the app, unable to use it to order meals or other products directly from chat, or tweet a photo taken using WeChat.

The differences in the way the American and Chinese markets work are just one example of how even in a fully interconnected world – with instant communications and nearly instant travel options – cultures and countries still retain independent identities, to the extent that marketers who failed to recognize just how different the world outside their neighborhood really is lost valuable time and money before realizing that they were a lot less well-informed than they should have been before foraying outside familiar territory.

ContributionsDevelopmentIndustry

Cordoba Leading Argentina to Strengthen Their Position in LATAM Video Game Industry

October 25, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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BY HERNAN LOPEZ, EPIC LLAMA

After a lot of hard work, the new law “Ley audiovisual” was approved by the legislature in Cordoba, Argentina. What does it mean? Why should you care about it?

Well, first let’s talk about the law itself: to clarify, it’s not a law that helps only video games, but any audiovisual production, but since we like videogames… let’s talk about what it does for the video game industry!

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Understanding Chinese Gaming: Seven Asian MMORPGs That Changed Gaming in China

August 8, 2016 — by Luke Stapley, Chinese Game Market Consultant

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Nihao! Hello and welcome to China! Most game developers in the mobile space are starting to branch out and look to other markets. There’s been some strong interest in China. With over a billion people and about 400 million smartphones being used in China according to IDC, most developers are drooling over the idea of making a game for the Chinese market. Consultant for the Chinese game market Luke Stapley tells more. 


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Finding (and Acting on) the White Spaces in Mobile Gaming

July 23, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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There’s no doubt that the mobile games market is growing—even before the debut of Pokemon Go. Not only are more people playing on smartphones and tablets, but they’re dedicating increasingly more time and money as well. To grab a bigger share of this growth, developers and publishers need to target the right consumers with the right content. The first step in achieving this insight is understanding the past and future landscape of the mobile games space by addressing two core questions: Where is this growth coming from? and Where will growth come from next?
With these questions in mind, Nielsen Games recently analyzed its data on mobile gamers and their thoughts on hundreds of the top mobile games to provide industry-level insight into growth patterns. Manager Julia Valchanova and Senior Analyst Ian O’Neil share the learnings.


ContributionsDevelopmentIndustry

ZPLAY Participates in Casual Connect: Committed to the Globalization Strategy

July 17, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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Casual Connect USA will be held in San Francisco on 18th-20th July 2016. Talents in casual games will gather here, displaying a diversified window in the game industry. ZPLAY, with its popular mobile games PopStar! Official Version, BBTAN, Daddy Long Legs and new games BBTAN 2, Inner Circle, etc. will participate at Casual Connect USA, focusing on its diversified formats within game industry with game developers all over the world.

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DFS: The Story of a Blue Ocean in Europe

May 12, 2016 — by Valery Bollier of Oulala Games

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ZEturf
First there was ZEturf, then came Oulala.

In the late 2000s, I was the Marketing Director and shareholder of an online horse racing company called ZEturf. Our customer-centred stance soon made me realise that young customers’ demands between the ages of 18 and 35 were changing radically. Logically, this tied in with the fact that they had been raised with consistently innovative video games, leading up to their current desire to chase after the thrill of playing for money by playing games that were invented a century ago. Their expectations soared higher than a game based purely on luck, anticipating something more ambitious; a skill game, like most video games, that would subsequently enable them to prove their ”supremacy” over their peers and their community.

The question that inevitably arose is why the market was not making immediate arrangements for an offer in view of the rising demand for a new type of game.

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