main

BusinessDevelopmentExclusive InterviewsPR & Marketing

Matthieu Burleraux: PlayLab in His Pocket

May 14, 2017 — by David Radd

Playlab-Photos-Google-Chrome-2017-05-15-00-960x540.jpg

Matthieu Burleraux is the Business Development Director at Pocket PlayLab. The company is helping to provide mentorship on different matters to developer Cupcake, which the company invested $1 million into.

“We are helping them understand how to work around game KPIs, including in user acquisition, using these KPIs to optimize the game as well as their marketing campaign,” said Matthieu. “For example, we are focusing a lot on the daily cohorts, the LTV45 associated to them, the CPI, retention numbers, etc. We are also starting to help them on producing visual assets for UA and provide mentorship regarding developing the game on new platforms.”

 

“Before making the decision to work with Cupcake, we looked at the basic KPIs (ARPU, ARPPU, retention, virality, DAU, etc.) and their evolution over time, but we also looking into UA KPIs such as the CPI they had, ROI on UA, etc.” Matthieu continued. “The goal was for you to see if the game was sustainable and if we could grow it.”

ContributionsIndustry

Let’s Play: What it Means for the Gaming Industry

May 5, 2017 — by Industry Contributions

Depositphotos_84981286_l-2015-960x540.jpg

By Sara Parker, Writer and Editor

Gaming has become much more social and communal in recent years. Instead of being limited by your physical location and the number of controllers you have for a gaming console, you can connect and play with other gamers around the world. With this type of connection, new gaming platforms and types of interactions have emerged, such as Let’s Play. But what does this mean for the gaming industry?

What is Let’s Play?

Let’s Play is a style of videos that gamers make of themselves playing video, computer and mobile games. You can watch these videos on platforms like YouTube and Twitch. There also are different styles of Let’s Play. For example, Rooster Teeth has a whole series devoted to them playing video games badly. Twitch, on the other hand, usually shows off some of the most skilled players you can learn from and admire. Let’s Play videos are easy to watch from your computer at home or while you’re on the go with streaming options for smartphones like the Samsung Galaxy S8 plus. If you pre-ordered the device from T-Mobile, you can get the Gear VR, controller and Oculus bonus content for free. Plus, with VR becoming more popular for smartphones, you may also be able to watch Let’s Play videos on VR headsets in the near future.

It’s Entertaining

Gamers love watching Let’s Play videos because they are a good source of entertainment. There are brands, podcasters and YouTube stars, such as PewDiePie, that put out these videos as part of their media and entertainment series. Many of these people became popular because they are funny, witty or sarcastic.

You also may be interested in these videos because many of the players are truly amazing. This is how Twitch exploded onto the scene. You can learn tips and tricks from these players, or you can just see how professionals play some of your favorite games.

It Encourages New Game Play

One of the main benefits for Let’s Play videos is that it gives you a way to find new games you want to play. Many Let’s Play streamers try to hit a wide variety of games that fall under different genres and styles of game play. For example, they may upload videos for several horror games one week and then focus on fantasy games the next week.

If you’re looking for something new to play, this is a great way to preview games. If you like the look of the video game world or the game-play style, then you’re more likely to feel confident about spending money on the game.

It Could Affect Sales

Many people within the gaming industry are against Let’s Play videos, though. Their argument is that you may get your fill of the game by watching someone else play it, or you may see how the story line plays out and not want to play it yourself. This would then mean that you wouldn’t spend money to buy the game, which affects game developers’ bottom lines. The result in the industry could be that developers produce fewer games.

Let’s Play videos have been around in various forms for some time and don’t look like they’ll be going away any time soon. The gaming industry needs to keep this trend in mind when they’re developing games and find ways to use them to their advantage. In the meantime, enjoy watching your favorite personalities show off their skills (or lack thereof)!


Sara started her writing and editing career in the world of technology and gaming. She has written numerous articles about the tech world and knows more about the cloud than she ever thought she would. She’s an Android enthusiast and is always looking to learn about the next big thing in tech. She is an experienced writer and editor who’s always up for a good Oxford comma debate.

ContributionsEventsIndieNews

Southeast Asia Part 2: Developers from Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam at Indie Prize

April 25, 2017 — by Yuliya Moshkaryova

southeastasia2_banner-960x540.jpg

Eight games from Taiwan, one game from Thailand and two games from Vietnam continues the list of developers from Southeast Asia who were selected to participate in the international Indie Prize showcase during Casual Connect Asia 2017 in Singapore.

Game Title: Magnesia
Developer: 18Light Game Ltd.
Platform: PC
Website: www.18light.com.tw
Country: Taiwan

Magnesia is a 2D puzzle game made by 18 Light. Player plays as a little robot Orsted. Explore the mysterious planet Magnesia. This planet contains some special substances which create powerful magnetic force. The substances maintain planet’s resident basic living, but humans are eager to get it due to the energy shortage on earth, so the war begin between three groups, humans that want to conquer, humans that protect Magnesia and residents on Magnesia. In this situation, Orsted has to determine what and who she should trust.

ContributionsEventsIndieNews

Southeast Asia Part 1: Philippines and Malaysia at Indie Prize Singapore 2017

April 24, 2017 — by Yuliya Moshkaryova

southeastasia1_banner-1-960x540.jpg

Five games from Philippines and twelve games from Malaysia were invited to the international Indie Prize showcase during Casual Connect Asia 2017 in Singapore.

Game Title: The Letter
Developer: Yangyang Mobile
Platform: Desktop Win, Desktop Mac
Website: http://www.yangyangmobile.com/
Country: Philippines

The Letter is a non-chronological, horror visual novel game with seven playable characters. It also features full English voice acting, several branching paths with more than 10 endings, highly animated character sprites and backgrounds, and quick-time events.

ContributionsEventsIndieNews

Singaporean-based Studios at Indie Prize Singapore 2017

April 22, 2017 — by Yuliya Moshkaryova

singapore_banner-1-960x540.jpg

Sixteen games from Singaporean-based teams will be showcased at Indie Prize during Casual Connect Asia 2017 in Singapore.

Game Title: NEO Impossible Bosses
Developer: Edwin Fan LiangDeng
Platform: Desktop Win
Website: neoimpossiblebosses.coder-ddeng.com
Country: Singapore

NEO Impossible Bosses is an RTS-MOBA Raidboss Rush in which you utilize a number of heroes to defeat the IMPOSSIBLE BOSSES!

ContributionsEventsIndustryNews

Esports for Indie Mobile Developers: Mad Skills Motocross Championship Deep Dive

April 4, 2017 — by Industry Contributions

MadSkillsMotocrossChampionship_players-960x720.jpg

By Simon Sundén, head of Esports at Gumbler

With over 31 million downloads, Mad Skills Motocross 2 has continued to be a success for developer Turborilla since its launch in 2014. This is primarily due to a loyal player base, many of which are involved in real-life Motocross, as well as partnerships with the likes of RedBull for exclusive events. Looking to drive more community engagement, Turborilla decided to up the ante in October 2015 by introducing real-money challenges via Swedish skills-based esports platform, Gumbler.

Based purely on a player’s skill, Gumbler brings esports to mobile games by enabling players to win real cash through placing money on their abilities. After integrating Gumbler, Mad Skills Motocross 2 saw players win upward of $900,000 in 2016 – with some individual players earning as much as $6,000 per month.

Having seen the high levels of engagement from the Mad Skills Motocross 2 community, Gumbler worked with Turborilla to host its first World Championship at the beginning of 2017 with a prize pot of $20,000.

For Gumbler, the goal was simple as its Head of Esports, Simon Sunden explains:

Exclusive InterviewsIndie

Planet of the Apps: Winning With a Circle Sweep

March 31, 2017 — by David Radd

Header-960x540.jpeg

Circle Sweep is a mobile puzzle game from developer Planet of the Apps. While mobile puzzle games is a popular genre, the developer feels like they have an original spin that people will enjoy.

“Planet of the Apps is a small studio and we love doing games,” said Ben Engel-Kacen, Planet of the Apps Founder and CEO. “Our strength and passion had always been innovating new gameplay mechanics. We have released over 30 different games and with each we did our best to create an original gameplay mechanic which we enjoy playing ourselves.”

“At one point, we saw that the matching puzzle genre is a very popular one but with very little innovation. Everyone just keeps copying the same mechanics, and sometimes even art style, from the leading games, making all games feel the same,” added Ben. “We felt the time is right for a fresh game mechanic, and that if we’ll manage to hit the right one, we may even win a large percentage of the players.”

Tel Aviv 2016Video Coverage

Paivi Putsepp-Seufert on Succeeding with Mobile User Acquisition | Casual Connect Video

March 27, 2017 — by Catherine Quinton

20150903_111507_THE_08377-960x640.jpg
New tech innovations make you be on your toes and catch up; otherwise, you are behind. - Paivi PutseppClick To Tweet

In a lecture entitled Mobile UA Tips from the Inside Paivi Putsepp-Seufert, Business Development Officer of Unity Ads at Unity Tehnologies, Paivi described what people consider best practices for mobile UA. If you would like to know more about how to run a successful mobile UA campaign, be sure to watch the video of Paivi’s presentation at Casual Connect Tel Aviv below and note the tips she offers there. Some tips that Paivi offered regarding best video campaign practice: use multiple videos, targeting should be done based on data and not assumptions, and use an optimal video length of 22 seconds. To learn more, tune in to the full lecture video below.

Tel Aviv 2016Video Coverage

Eitan Reisel on How Google Can Help Developers Grow | Casual Connect Video

March 24, 2017 — by Catherine Quinton

Eitan-Reisel-speaking-at-CC-Tel-Aviv-960x640.jpg
85% of app revenue has been from games. By 2020, that's a $75 billion ecosystem! - Eitan ReiselClick To Tweet

Data is key for better targeting, as you need to know who to monetize, Google Israel’s Head of Gaming Eitan Reisel suggests, and warns: small companies need to make careful decisions when addressing monetization issues, and it’s better to be cautious about what platform will suit you best. Solution? Break down the game to different stages along the funnel to maximize targeting and insights. They explain more in their Casual Connect Tel Aviv talk. 

EventsIndustry

GREE CEO to Speak on Industry Change at Casual Connect Europe

January 23, 2017 — by Casey Rock

gree-960x467.jpg

Andrew Sheppard has had a productive career – playing key roles at companies like Kabam, hi5, Electronic Arts and Outspark. Now, as the newly appointed CEO of GREE International Entertainment, Inc., he will share his expertise and insights with the audience at Casual Connect Europe in Berlin, Germany, as its keynote speaker on February 7.

So what type of experience does Andrew bring to the conference and what can developers and other games industry professionals hope to learn? Here is a quick look back at Andrew’s career and what to look forward to at Casual Connect Europe.

logo
SUPPORTED BY