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DevelopmentExclusive Interviews

Dave Bisceglia and The Tap Lab: Evolving with the Game Industry

September 20, 2016 — by Catherine Quinton

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Have a unified lifetime value perspective for user acquisition. - Dave BiscegliaClick To Tweet

Dave Bisceglia is Co-Founder and CEO of The Tap Lab. At this mobile game studio, based in Cambridge, MA, Dave focuses on game design, product management and business development. During the past two years, since Gamesauce last talked with Dave, The Tap Lab has transitioned from self-publishing their own IP to working with major publishers and third-party IPs. Dave’s role as CEO now is concentrated much more on business development and relationships with publishers and IPs. They emphasize, “We’ve been fortunate to work with some great partners on projects we’re passionate about.”


Editorial

Mobile vs. Consoles: War or Coexistence?

August 28, 2016 — by David Radd

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Newzoo predicted that in 2016, revenue from tablets and smartphones will generate $36.9 billion U.S. dollars in revenue. This will comprise 37 percent of the total market, making it the first year that mobile game revenue is expected to be greater than either console gaming or PC gaming, which are pegged at $31.9 billion U.S. dollars and $29 billion U.S. dollars respectively.

Newzoo games market segments

While this is a clear demonstration of the growth of the mobile market, which is expected to increase its share as the total revenue of the gaming industry is expected to be $118.6 billion in 2019, it does not mean the end for either gaming on PC or consoles. In fact, PC gaming is expected to see a 2.1 percent increase in revenue this year while console gaming revenue will rise 4.5 percent.

It seemed like the continued rise of mobile gaming might displace console gaming and many predicted just that a few years ago. That doesn’t seem to be the case, however, and we’re going to name the various ways that neither mobile nor console games will replace the other.

Game DevelopmentPostmortem

Gamester: A Game About You and Friends. Yes, You!

August 23, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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Giant Fox Studios started about 5 years ago, and the team was initially working on Flash games. Since then they developed close to 200 games. At Casual Connect USA 2016 they presented Gamester – an opportunity to be in your own game: just take a pic, select the genre, environment and enemies. You can even use your own storyline and add voiceovers! CEO Jaime Fraina tells more.


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Shield of God: Story Defined by Genre

August 10, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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A New Age 3D strategy game made in China… Wait! MADE IN CHINA? Typically, anything made in China smells suspicious… In mobile it’s about some biased comments including but not limited to copying, out-of-line translation, not very user-friendly and so-much-text UI, etc. When Gunship Studio positioned themselves as the 3D game studio targeting overseas market, they chose a hard path… Yes Games is a mobile game developer founded in 2011. Gunship is one of the six studios under it. Unlike others who got famous IP support from Toei Animations (such as Dragon Ball and One Piece), Gunship has spent more than 12 months finding out what kind of game they want to make. The end result is Shield of God, whose story is told by the company’s overseas business director Amy Ho


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New Industry Report Reveals that Only 2 out of 10 Game Downloads Retain Users after 30 Days

July 26, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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By Connie Hwong, global content marketing director at Verto Analytics

Whether you’re a big-time game publisher or indie, the challenges that every mobile game developer faces are the same: acquiring users and keeping their attention well past download. It’s simple to say but hard to do: less than 20 percent of all game downloads result in active users after 30 days.

Even with real-time data and sophisticated mobile analytics, how many mobile gaming industry insiders really know what’s working well? Almost all game developers struggle to answer these questions:

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Finding (and Acting on) the White Spaces in Mobile Gaming

July 23, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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There’s no doubt that the mobile games market is growing—even before the debut of Pokemon Go. Not only are more people playing on smartphones and tablets, but they’re dedicating increasingly more time and money as well. To grab a bigger share of this growth, developers and publishers need to target the right consumers with the right content. The first step in achieving this insight is understanding the past and future landscape of the mobile games space by addressing two core questions: Where is this growth coming from? and Where will growth come from next?
With these questions in mind, Nielsen Games recently analyzed its data on mobile gamers and their thoughts on hundreds of the top mobile games to provide industry-level insight into growth patterns. Manager Julia Valchanova and Senior Analyst Ian O’Neil share the learnings.


Asia 2016Video Coverage

Chenyu Cui and Analyzing Fun | Casual Connect Video

July 6, 2016 — by Catherine Quinton

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'The lack of good hardware for the Chinese market is the main problem.' - Chenyu CuiClick To Tweet

With China’s console ban lifted and the growth of Android-based set-top boxes, TV games look like the new blue sea for games publishers and/or developers. However, due to younger players and SARFT censorship, sales are not encouraging. The exception in China is VR which has sparked a new industry passion for TV games. In this session from Casual Connect Asia, analyst for IHS Chenyu Cui discussed the VR market in China and shared IHS’ forecast of installed headsets and sales value. Chenyu explained, “The future Chinese VR market will be relatively small. Most of the future market will be made of adapter headset which doesn’t give good quality or a good experience. The lack of good hardware for the Chinese market is the main problem.” To learn more about VR in the Chinese market, watch this video of Chenyu’s complete session.

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Ellipsis: premium, no text, no ads, no IAP

June 29, 2016 — by Industry Contributions

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Ellipsis is an award-winning action puzzler with retro-styled visuals and absolutely zero text. Designed from the ground up for touch devices, it was released on iOS in February 2016 and for Android on June 16th. Its intuitive concept is easy to understand but you soon uncover a deep and challenging universe of ever-evolving levels. Ellipsis is a polished game experience, developed with a bit of idealistic, opinionated approach. Released as a premium game, it features no text, no ads, no IAP. The developers headed by Yacine Salmi explore how these decisions impacted our development and release.)


EventsNews

The Future is Here with VR and AR at Casual Connect USA

June 27, 2016 — by David Radd and Sasha Paleeva

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Mobile is a significant growth sector for the gaming industry and many are expecting VR to be the next big thing for the industry. In Next-Gen: VR & AR track, Casual Connect USA will explore the what game makers are doing to make the sector take off and what investors want it to succeed.

VR’s Rapid Growth

While there’s a lot of excitement surrounding augmented reality and virtual reality, there’s also a lot of confusion as well. The potential for VR is huge while AR might be even larger over the long term, right now there are more questions than there are answers. Looking at the full breadth of the industry, Tim Merel, founder/CEO of Eyetouch Reality and Digi-Capital, will look at AR/VR revenue forecasts, sectors, business models, investment, core tech, pricing and users. The session titled “The Reality of AR/VR” will look extensively at the facts and figures of AR/VR.vrcollage

With platforms like Vive, Oculus, PlayStation VR and Samsung Gear VR, consumer VR has definitely arrived. However, it can be a challenge for developers to make sense of these myriad platforms and decided which to target. Game developer Edward McNeill will talk about the differences between these various VR platforms, talking from the experience of someone who has already launched to VR titles in “How to Pick a VR Platform”.

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